Pictured: Gary Schwartz & Mark Dickson
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 22, 2013

Two clinical trials of targeted therapies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators show promising results against different types of sarcoma.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 4, 2013

Early research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering cautions against combining ipilimumab and vemurafenib for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have used genetically modified immune cells to eradicate cancer in five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pictured: James Fagin
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, February 14, 2013

Researchers have found that the investigational drug selumetinib shuts down the signaling of genetic mutations that prevent some patients’ thyroid cancer tumors from absorbing radioiodine, the most effective treatment for the disease.

Pictured: Kenneth Yu
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, January 29, 2013

New research suggests that analyzing genetic changes found in the bloodstream may help doctors predict which chemotherapy regimens will work for some patients.

Pictured: Mark Bilsky
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 25, 2013

Our doctors have shown that tumors compressing the spinal cord can be controlled using less-invasive surgery combined with a precise, intense form of radiation therapy.

Pictured: Marcel R. M. van den Brink
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have shown for the first time that administering a growth factor called interleukin-7 can help patients regenerate T cells more quickly after stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: Paul Chapman
Finding
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, December 7, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts add to their knowledge of vemurafenib, a drug recently approved by the FDA to treat some patients with metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA and Media Staff
Friday, November 30, 2012

Study signals hope for maintaining sexual function in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

Pictured: Martin Weiser
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 8, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s colorectal cancer team has developed online prediction tools that assess disease risk following surgery, enabling patients and physicians to make better treatment decisions.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 9, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeons have pioneered a technique that may improve quality of life for women with early-stage gynecologic cancers.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Pictured: At Eternity’s Gate by Vincent van Gogh
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 30, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that people in the late stages of cancer might benefit from meaning-centered psychotherapy, a treatment aimed at helping people sustain a sense of meaning and purpose.

Pictured: Elizabeth Morris
In the O.R.
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Allyson Collins, MS
Friday, March 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering is the first and only hospital in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to offer a new, more patient-friendly approach for doctors to precisely pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

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