Pictured: Lisa Sclafani
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Dr. Sclafani, who practices at Memorial Sloan Kettering Commack, wants newly diagnosed patients to leave her office with hope and with a plan of action for treating the cancer.

Pictured: Bernard Bochner
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, January 11, 2013

Dr. Bochner – who specializes in treating people with prostate, bladder, and kidney cancers – discusses the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach to delivering high-quality care.

Pictured: Prasad Adusumilli
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 3, 2013

A team from Memorial Sloan Kettering has found that the makeup of immune cells in a lung tumor and in tissue surrounding a tumor can predict whether the cancer will recur after surgery.

Pictured: Richard Barakat
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, December 28, 2012

Dr. Barakat explains the latest surgical techniques for improving outcomes and quality of life in women with cervical, ovarian, and other gynecologic cancers.

Pictured: X-ray Image
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Scientists have identified genes and biological mechanisms that one day could be targeted with drugs to stop kidney cancer from spreading to the bone, brain, or other organs.

Pictured: Steven Wang
Q&A
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 17, 2012

By mid-December 2012, sunscreen products on store shelves in the United States must meet stricter labeling regulations. Dr. Wang answers key questions on this topic.

Pictured: Paul Chapman
Finding
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, December 7, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts add to their knowledge of vemurafenib, a drug recently approved by the FDA to treat some patients with metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Clifford Hudis
Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 5, 2012

New, potentially practice-changing research sheds light on the long-term benefits of estrogen-blocking tamoxifen therapy in women with early-stage breast cancer whose disease is estrogen-receptor positive.

Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA and Media Staff
Friday, November 30, 2012

Study signals hope for maintaining sexual function in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

Pictured: Carol Brown
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Gynecologic cancer surgeon Dr. Brown discusses how doctors and nurses collaborate to care for patients, from diagnosis through lifelong follow-up.

Pictured: PET Scan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

Pictured: Jatin Shah
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Monday, November 12, 2012

Dr. Shah, Chief of the Head and Neck Service, discusses how Memorial Sloan Kettering’s world-renowned head and neck surgeons partner with patients to select the most appropriate treatment plan.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Snjezana Dogan
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 9, 2012

A genetic analysis of tumors suggests women are more susceptible than men to the most common form of lung cancer.

Pictured: Martin Weiser
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 8, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s colorectal cancer team has developed online prediction tools that assess disease risk following surgery, enabling patients and physicians to make better treatment decisions.

Pictured: Ping Chi
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 2, 2012

Dr. Chi, a physician-scientist and member of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, studies genetic and epigenetic changes that cause cancer.

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