Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Pictured: Graduates
Event
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, May 18, 2012

As part of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s 33rd annual academic convocation on May 11, the Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences awarded PhDs to four graduates.

Pictured: Paul Paik
Finding
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, May 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering was one of the first centers to use this type of genetic testing for lung cancer patients and is currently one of the only centers testing for mutations in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

Pictured: Neural stem cells
Philanthropy
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, May 11, 2012

Research at Memorial Sloan Kettering will benefit from renewed support for The Starr Cancer Consortium and the Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative totaling $105 million.

Pictured: At Eternity’s Gate by Vincent van Gogh
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 30, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that people in the late stages of cancer might benefit from meaning-centered psychotherapy, a treatment aimed at helping people sustain a sense of meaning and purpose.

Pictured: Moritz Kircher
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that enables specific and accurate labeling of brain tumor tissue in mice. If proven effective in patients, the method could make complete surgical removal of brain tumors more feasible.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok and James Allison
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Friday, April 20, 2012

In an article describing the history and promise of immunotherapy for cancer treatment, the magazine highlights the groundbreaking work of James Allison, Chair of the Sloan Kettering Institute’s Immunology Program, and medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok.

Pictured: Michael Kharas
Profile
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 11, 2012

As a child, Michael Kharas knew that he wanted to “be making the drugs doctors use to cure people.” Today he investigates molecular processes that stem cells and tumor cells have in common – in the hopes of uncovering insights for treatments for cancer and other diseases.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, April 3, 2012

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research, held its 2012 annual meeting in Chicago.

Pictured: Kidney CancerSmart Lecture
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, March 28, 2012

March is Kidney Cancer Awareness Month. Watch the latest videos of our kidney cancer experts discussing advances in diagnosis and personalized treatment at our CancerSmart lecture series.

Pictured: Monica Morrow
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Dr. Morrow is the first surgeon and the first person from Memorial Sloan Kettering to receive the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s award, which recognizes breast cancer researchers who are also excellent mentors.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Beginning in April 2013, physician-scientist Charles Sawyers will serve as President of the American Association for Cancer Research, the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research.

Research
Pictured: Elizabeth Morris
In the O.R.
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Allyson Collins, MS
Friday, March 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering is the first and only hospital in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to offer a new, more patient-friendly approach for doctors to precisely pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Center News

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