Pictured: Kenneth Offit & Zsofia Stadler
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators have found that some testicular cancers arising early in life may result from genetic changes that have not been inherited from either parent.

Pictured: Tari King
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Dr. King talks about her research investigating why certain women develop breast cancer and about the long-term relationships she maintains with her patients.

Pictured: Joao Xavier and Eric Pamer
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 19, 2012

New studies investigate how the use of antibiotics affects the balance of both harmful and beneficial bacteria in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 9, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeons have pioneered a technique that may improve quality of life for women with early-stage gynecologic cancers.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Farid Boulad
Profile
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Monday, July 2, 2012

Pediatric Day Hospital Medical Director Farid Boulad explains that “we’re trying to excel at caring for the entire child, physically and emotionally.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Finding
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor and Irene Jarchum, PhD
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

Pictured: Harold Varmus
Feature
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, June 13, 2012

A May 11 ceremony recognized doctoral and honorary degree recipients and featured National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus as the keynote speaker.

Feature
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering and IBM have agreed to collaborate on the development of a powerful tool built upon IBM Watson to provide medical professionals with improved access to comprehensive cancer data and practices.

Pictured: Chaya Moskowitz
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 4, 2012

A new study confirms that female childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation to the chest have a high risk of developing breast cancer at a young age – a risk that is comparable to that of women who have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

Pictured: Nikola Pavletich and Alexander Rudensky
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Structural Biology Program Chair Nikola P. Pavletich and immunologist Alexander Y. Rudensky have received one of the highest honors given to scientists working in the United States.

Pictured: Peter Bach
Q&A
By Allyson Collins, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

In an interview, Dr. Bach talks about research showing that CT screening may prevent one in five cancer deaths for people at a very high risk of developing lung cancer.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

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