Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

Pictured: Harold Varmus
Feature
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, June 13, 2012

A May 11 ceremony recognized doctoral and honorary degree recipients and featured National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus as the keynote speaker.

Feature
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering and IBM have agreed to collaborate on the development of a powerful tool built upon IBM Watson to provide medical professionals with improved access to comprehensive cancer data and practices.

Pictured: Chaya Moskowitz
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 4, 2012

A new study confirms that female childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation to the chest have a high risk of developing breast cancer at a young age – a risk that is comparable to that of women who have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

Pictured: Nikola Pavletich and Alexander Rudensky
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Structural Biology Program Chair Nikola P. Pavletich and immunologist Alexander Y. Rudensky have received one of the highest honors given to scientists working in the United States.

Pictured: Peter Bach
Q&A
By Allyson Collins, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

In an interview, Dr. Bach talks about research showing that CT screening may prevent one in five cancer deaths for people at a very high risk of developing lung cancer.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Pictured: Graduates
Event
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, May 18, 2012

As part of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s 33rd annual academic convocation on May 11, the Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences awarded PhDs to four graduates.

Pictured: Paul Paik
Finding
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, May 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering was one of the first centers to use this type of genetic testing for lung cancer patients and is currently one of the only centers testing for mutations in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

Pictured: Neural stem cells
Philanthropy
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, May 11, 2012

Research at Memorial Sloan Kettering will benefit from renewed support for The Starr Cancer Consortium and the Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative totaling $105 million.

Pictured: At Eternity’s Gate by Vincent van Gogh
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 30, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that people in the late stages of cancer might benefit from meaning-centered psychotherapy, a treatment aimed at helping people sustain a sense of meaning and purpose.

Pictured: Moritz Kircher
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that enables specific and accurate labeling of brain tumor tissue in mice. If proven effective in patients, the method could make complete surgical removal of brain tumors more feasible.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok and James Allison
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Friday, April 20, 2012

In an article describing the history and promise of immunotherapy for cancer treatment, the magazine highlights the groundbreaking work of James Allison, Chair of the Sloan Kettering Institute’s Immunology Program, and medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok.

Pictured: Michael Kharas
Profile
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 11, 2012

As a child, Michael Kharas knew that he wanted to “be making the drugs doctors use to cure people.” Today he investigates molecular processes that stem cells and tumor cells have in common – in the hopes of uncovering insights for treatments for cancer and other diseases.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

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