Pictured: William Tap
MSK at ASCO
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, May 15, 2014

New Memorial Sloan Kettering research demonstrates the powerful clinical benefit of giving patients a drug that targets the molecular abnormality driving the growth of a rare and debilitating joint disease.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
Q&A
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 5, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering Clinical Genetics Service Chief Kenneth Offit discusses ways for women to clearly assess their risk for breast and ovarian cancers.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the News
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 2, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientist Jedd Wolchok describes striking advances in cancer immunotherapy in New York Times and Scientific American.

Pictured: Bhuvanesh Singh
Q&A
By Christina Pernambuco-Holsten, MA  |  Friday, April 25, 2014

The HPV vaccine has brought the link between HPV and cervical cancer to the attention of many Americans, but HPV is also behind the fastest-growing type of head and neck cancer in the nation.

In the News
By Jennifer Bassett, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Robin Roberts is joined on Good Morning America by Sergio Giralt, Chief of the Adult Bone Marrow Transplantation Service.

Cancer Guide
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 17, 2014

Molecular analysis of lung tumors can help guide treatment decisions. Memorial Sloan Kettering is one of only a handful of centers nationwide to offer this personalized approach to care.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Mary Jane Massie & Tari King
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 7, 2014

Increasingly, women diagnosed with cancer in one breast are choosing to have their other, healthy breast removed, but experts say this additional surgery provides no survival benefits.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit, Alexandra Heerdt, Emily Glogowski & Max Gomez
Video
By Helen Garey, MPH, Freelance Writer  |  Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Cancer genetics experts say the discovery of the BRCA gene mutations has transformed the way doctors prevent and treat hereditary cancers. Read the post and watch the video.

Pictured: Julio Garcia-Aguilar
Ask the Expert
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Tuesday, March 25, 2014

In this Ask the Expert feature, colorectal surgeon Julio Garcia-Aguilar discusses the differences between laparoscopy and robotic surgery and explains which patients are the best candidates for these procedures.

Pictured: Sandra D’Angelo
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, March 21, 2014

Medical oncologist Sandra D’Angelo, who specializes in caring for patients with rare cancers such as melanoma, soft tissue sarcoma, and Merkel cell carcinoma, talks about the team approach and the importance of empowering patients.

Pictured: Richard Steingart
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Cancer treatments, both traditional treatments and newer targeted therapies, can lead to short-term and long-term heart problems.

Pictured: José Baselga
HONOR
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Tuesday, March 18, 2014

As leader of the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research, Dr. Baselga will expand his role in accelerating cancer prevention and discovery.

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