In the News
By Jennifer Bassett, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 11, 2014

IBM’s Watson won Jeopardy!, but what if its power could be used for the greater good to help make better cancer care choices?

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Mary Jane Massie & Tari King
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 7, 2014

Increasingly, women diagnosed with cancer in one breast are choosing to have their other, healthy breast removed, but experts say this additional surgery provides no survival benefits.

Pictured: Alice Ho
Q&A
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 3, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering Radiation Safety Officer Jean St. Germain answers common questions about the safety of adults undergoing radiation treatment for cancer.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit, Alexandra Heerdt, Emily Glogowski & Max Gomez
Video
By Helen Garey, MPH, Freelance Writer  |  Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Cancer genetics experts say the discovery of the BRCA gene mutations has transformed the way doctors prevent and treat hereditary cancers. Read the post and watch the video.

Pictured: Julio Garcia-Aguilar
Ask the Expert
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Tuesday, March 25, 2014

In this Ask the Expert feature, colorectal surgeon Julio Garcia-Aguilar discusses the differences between laparoscopy and robotic surgery and explains which patients are the best candidates for these procedures.

Pictured: Sandra D’Angelo
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, March 21, 2014

Medical oncologist Sandra D’Angelo, who specializes in caring for patients with rare cancers such as melanoma, soft tissue sarcoma, and Merkel cell carcinoma, talks about the team approach and the importance of empowering patients.

Pictured: Richard Steingart
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Cancer treatments, both traditional treatments and newer targeted therapies, can lead to short-term and long-term heart problems.

Pictured: Kathryn Beal
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 17, 2014

A high-dose radiation treatment that can be given in one day has become an effective and increasingly common approach for patients with metastatic brain tumors.

Pictured: Susan Prockop & Lucas T.
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 6, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientists have prevented a dangerous complication of stem cell transplantation using immune cells donated from a third party.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Sergio Giralt
Honor
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s leadership in blood and marrow stem cell transplantation is on full display at the 2014 BMT Tandem Meeting.

Pictured: William Jarnagin
Cancer Guide
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Thanks to recent treatment advances, many people diagnosed with liver cancer today can expect to survive the disease. But experience counts.

Pictured: Abraham Wu
Ask the Expert
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, February 24, 2014

CyberKnife is a brand name for one of several available devices that deliver intense doses of radiation with very high accuracy.

Pictured: Diane Reidy
Feature
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Cycle for Survival, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s nationwide indoor team cycling event, helps support research into rare cancers. Three researchers discuss how these funds benefit their research.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.