Pictured: Three-dimensional structure of the protein mTOR
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 30, 2013

In an eagerly awaited study, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers report on the molecular structure of mTOR, a protein commonly mutated in cancer.

Pictured:  Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 24, 2013

Investigators have sequenced the genome of adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare and deadly head and neck cancer. The work sets the stage for the sequencing of additional rare cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Research suggests that a new drug could be effective in patients with prostate cancer who develop resistance to the targeted therapy enzalutamide.

Pictured: Liang Deng
Profile
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 26, 2013

Physician-scientist Liang Deng cares for patients with melanoma and other skin cancers, and also conducts innovative research on poxviruses.

Pictured: Major Trends in Modern Cancer Research Seminar
Video
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 1, 2013

At the seventh annual seminar for high school students and teachers, investigators discuss how cutting-edge biomedical research may ultimately contribute to better treatments for cancer patients.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: X-ray Image
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Scientists have identified genes and biological mechanisms that one day could be targeted with drugs to stop kidney cancer from spreading to the bone, brain, or other organs.

Pictured: Ming Li
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 14, 2012

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering immunologists might one day pave the way for new strategies to control a range of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 19, 2012

In the lab of cancer biologist Scott Lowe, researchers are investigating the processes that naturally inhibit cancer development.

Pictured: PET Scan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

Pictured: Tunneling Nanotubes
Snapshot
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered a way that cancer cells may be able to exchange information by establishing long bridges between cells called tunneling nanotubes.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Filippo Giancotti
In the Lab
By Media Staff  |  Friday, August 24, 2012

A new Memorial Sloan Kettering study has identified one of the proteins fueling the spread of some breast cancers, and researchers hope their findings will lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and drugs.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Michael Kharas
Profile
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 11, 2012

As a child, Michael Kharas knew that he wanted to “be making the drugs doctors use to cure people.” Today he investigates molecular processes that stem cells and tumor cells have in common – in the hopes of uncovering insights for treatments for cancer and other diseases.

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