Pictured: Scott Lowe
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 19, 2012

In the lab of cancer biologist Scott Lowe, researchers are investigating the processes that naturally inhibit cancer development.

Pictured: PET Scan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

Pictured: Tunneling Nanotubes
Snapshot
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered a way that cancer cells may be able to exchange information by establishing long bridges between cells called tunneling nanotubes.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Filippo Giancotti
In the Lab
By Media Staff  |  Friday, August 24, 2012

A new Memorial Sloan Kettering study has identified one of the proteins fueling the spread of some breast cancers, and researchers hope their findings will lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and drugs.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Michael Kharas
Profile
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 11, 2012

As a child, Michael Kharas knew that he wanted to “be making the drugs doctors use to cure people.” Today he investigates molecular processes that stem cells and tumor cells have in common – in the hopes of uncovering insights for treatments for cancer and other diseases.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 13, 2012

In a large-scale genome-sequencing study, researchers have discovered mutations in neuroblastoma tumors that could aid the development of diagnostic tests and therapies.

Pictured: Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies provide new clues about genetic mutations that affect cell behavior and play a role in several types of cancer.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Laetitia Borsu
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have performed the first large-scale genetic analysis of several pediatric cancers, identifying mutations and potential targets for therapies to treat the cancers.

Pictured: Hans-Guido Wendel
Profile
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 20, 2011

German-born cancer biologist Hans-Guido Wendel is taking advantage of transformative advances in genomics technology to understand key genetic abnormalities in leukemia and lymphoma.

Pictured: Breast tumor treated with paclitaxel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 2, 2011

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators suggest it might be possible to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy for breast cancer by combining the treatment with a new type of drug called a cathepsin inhibitor.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.