Pictured: Joan Massagué
Announcement
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Monday, November 25, 2013

Internationally recognized cancer biologist Joan Massagué has been named Director of the Sloan Kettering Institute. He was previously Chair of the Cancer Biology and Genetics Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Oliver Zivanovic, Garrett Nash & Dennis Chi
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts are leading investigations of a procedure called hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, also known as HIPEC.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The study of some victims exposed to ionizing radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident is yielding new information about how radiation-induced thyroid cancer develops.

Pictured: Sarat Chandarlapaty
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 8, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found genetic mutations that cause some breast cancers to develop resistance to hormone therapy.

Pictured: Stephen Long & Alexandria Miller
Profile
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Thursday, November 7, 2013

Stephen Long works to understand how proteins work by determining what they look like in three dimensions.

Pictured: Craig Thompson
Event
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 4, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s annual seminar exposes high school students and their teachers to cutting-edge scientific research.

Pictured: Clifford Hudis
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, November 1, 2013

Medical oncologist Clifford Hudis says advances in immunology and molecular biology are leading to remarkable successes in cancer treatment.

Pictured: Laurie Glimcher, Craig Thompson, Marc Tessier-Lavigne & Tadataka Yamada
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 24, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering is joining with two other academic institutions in a pioneering collaboration to speed early-stage drug discoveries into therapies for patients.

Pictured: Mark Robson
Q&A
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 21, 2013

As genome sequencing of tumors becomes more routine, it increases the odds that additional disease-related mutations may be discovered by accident, a development that raises profound issues.

Pictured: Emily Foley
Profile
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Friday, October 18, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering cell biologist Emily Foley discusses her research, which is focused on improving the understanding of cell division.

Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Pictured: James E. Rothman, Thomas C. Südhof & Randy W. Schekman
Honor
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 14, 2013

James Rothman, who receives this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with Randy Schekman and Thomas Südhof, conducted more than a decade of his seminal research at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Breast cancer mosaic
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists are developing new imaging instrumentation that could enable pathologist and surgeons to collaborate more seamlessly and reduce the need for repeat surgeries.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Daniel Thorek & Jan Grimm
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A new imaging approach being investigated by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers could provide better information about a tumor’s molecular activity, allowing for a more accurate diagnosis.

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