Pictured: Neurons
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, February 11, 2013

Researchers have clarified the process by which developing nerve cells are directed to specialize into distinct parts.

Pictured: Mark Kris
Perspective
By Mark Kris, MD, Chief, Thoracic Oncology Service  |  Friday, February 8, 2013

Medical oncologist Mark Kris discusses how cancer experts are working to train IBM Watson to help assist medical professionals.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: Kenneth Yu
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, January 29, 2013

New research suggests that analyzing genetic changes found in the bloodstream may help doctors predict which chemotherapy regimens will work for some patients.

Pictured: Mark Bilsky
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 25, 2013

Our doctors have shown that tumors compressing the spinal cord can be controlled using less-invasive surgery combined with a precise, intense form of radiation therapy.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers' Laboratory
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, January 7, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s notable research advances include the approval of a new drug for men with advanced prostate cancer that was developed and studied by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Pictured: Prasad Adusumilli
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 3, 2013

A team from Memorial Sloan Kettering has found that the makeup of immune cells in a lung tumor and in tissue surrounding a tumor can predict whether the cancer will recur after surgery.

Pictured: Diversity Programs
On Our Website
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Monday, December 31, 2012

Our Office of Diversity Programs offers information and resources about clinical care, research, and training focused on reducing cancer health disparities in medically underserved populations.

Pictured: Marcel R. M. van den Brink
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have shown for the first time that administering a growth factor called interleukin-7 can help patients regenerate T cells more quickly after stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: X-ray Image
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Scientists have identified genes and biological mechanisms that one day could be targeted with drugs to stop kidney cancer from spreading to the bone, brain, or other organs.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have reported a new method that could allow the development of more-specific, cell-based therapies for cancer.

Pictured: Ming Li
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 14, 2012

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering immunologists might one day pave the way for new strategies to control a range of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain & Jedd Wolchok
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Physician-scientists Michel Sadelain and Jedd Wolchok have been appointed to a new research team dedicated to investigating ways to harness the immune system to fight cancer.

Pictured: Lorenz Studer
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Methods to generate stem cells have given scientists new ways to study some diseases and identify potential drugs, and could one day be used to rebuild diseased or damaged tissues in patients.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Saturday, December 8, 2012

Charles Sawyers, Chair of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, is widely recognized as someone who is revolutionizing the molecular treatment of cancer.

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