Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Daniel Thorek & Jan Grimm
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A new imaging approach being investigated by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers could provide better information about a tumor’s molecular activity, allowing for a more accurate diagnosis.

Pictured: Simon Boulton, Levi Garraway, and DJ Pan
Honor
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 23, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering has named three winners of this year’s Paul Marks Prize for Cancer research, an award that recognizes promising young investigators.

Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientist Charles Sawyers, who serves as president of the American Association for Cancer Research, highlights findings from the group’s new report.

Research
Pictured: Derek Tan
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 16, 2013

In this Q&A, Memorial Sloan Kettering chemist Derek Tan discusses why natural products offer inspiration for the development of new drugs.

Pictured: Lawrence Dauer
In the O.R.
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering clinicians report on a successful first year of using a new procedure to pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
In the Lab
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Monday, September 9, 2013

Researchers have found the first evidence that susceptibility to developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia during childhood may be heritable.

Pictured: Cancer cell lines
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 26, 2013

A recent study found that the cell lines most commonly used for research on ovarian cancer are not the most suitable.

Pictured: Barbara Raphael & Chioma Enweasor
Learning Curve
By Christina Pernambuco-Holsten, MA  |  Friday, August 23, 2013

Our summer fellowship program helps medical students learn to become physician-scientists. Read about one of our trainees who investigated an imaging tool for use in patients with a rare uterine cancer.

Pictured: Robert J. Motzer
In the Clinic
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, August 22, 2013

An international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering found that pazopanib (Votrient®) controls cancer as effectively as sunitinib (Sutent®) while improving patients’ quality of life.

Pictured: Micropapillary Morphology
In the Lab
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 9, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study shows that an abnormal cell pattern found in the tumor tissue of some lung cancer patients may help to predict which tumors are more likely to recur after surgery.

Pictured: Clostridium difficile
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Information about the microbiome, the genes of all the microorganisms that naturally inhabit the human body, is leading to new approaches for treating infections in cancer patients.

Pictured: Luciano Martelotto, Catherine Cowell & Jorge Reis-Filho
Profile
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 5, 2013

Jorge Reis-Filho studies the genetic alterations that drive the malignant behavior of cells in rare types of breast cancer.

Perspective
By Paul Sabbatini, MD, Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Clinical Research  |  Friday, July 26, 2013

The clinical trial remains our best tool to identify new therapies, but as with all tools, innovation is required if trials are to remain relevant.

Pictured: Scott Lowe & Zhen Zhao
Video
By Eva Kiesler, PhD and Allyson Collins, MS
Friday, July 19, 2013

Watch our scientists discuss how the Geoffrey Beene Center helped Memorial Sloan Kettering establish a progressive approach to modern cancer research.

Center News

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