Pictured: Elizabeth Morris
In the O.R.
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Allyson Collins, MS
Friday, March 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering is the first and only hospital in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to offer a new, more patient-friendly approach for doctors to precisely pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 13, 2012

In a large-scale genome-sequencing study, researchers have discovered mutations in neuroblastoma tumors that could aid the development of diagnostic tests and therapies.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, March 8, 2012

Findings from a multidisciplinary research team led by Memorial Sloan Kettering medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok could help shed light on the immune system’s role in fighting cancer.

Pictured: Ann Zauber
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Julie Grisham, MS
Thursday, February 23, 2012

For the first time, a new study has shown that removing polyps by colonoscopy not only prevents colorectal cancer from developing, but also prevents deaths from the disease.

Pictured: Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies provide new clues about genetic mutations that affect cell behavior and play a role in several types of cancer.

Pictured: Ion Channel K2P1
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 9, 2012

Structural biologist Stephen Long talks about how his team used x-ray crystallography to discover the structure of an ion channel called K2P1.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Laetitia Borsu
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have performed the first large-scale genetic analysis of several pediatric cancers, identifying mutations and potential targets for therapies to treat the cancers.

Finding
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 23, 2012

Research has shown that children who have experienced a sunburn at an early age are at almost double the risk for developing melanoma in adulthood. Now, a new study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering epidemiologist Stephen Dusza finds that most children do not regularly use sunscreen.

Pictured: Eric Pamer
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 20, 2012

Infections are a common cause of complications in cancer patients. Now a Memorial Sloan Kettering research team finds that a commonly prescribed antibiotic could increase susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

Pictured: Michael Morris
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Friday, January 13, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering have shown the usefulness of a scale called the Bone Scan Index (BSI) for determining whether some prostate cancer patients are responding to therapy.

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