Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Finding
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor and Irene Jarchum, PhD
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

Pictured: Chaya Moskowitz
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 4, 2012

A new study confirms that female childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation to the chest have a high risk of developing breast cancer at a young age – a risk that is comparable to that of women who have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Pictured: Paul Paik
Finding
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, May 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering was one of the first centers to use this type of genetic testing for lung cancer patients and is currently one of the only centers testing for mutations in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

Pictured: At Eternity’s Gate by Vincent van Gogh
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 30, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that people in the late stages of cancer might benefit from meaning-centered psychotherapy, a treatment aimed at helping people sustain a sense of meaning and purpose.

Pictured: Moritz Kircher
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that enables specific and accurate labeling of brain tumor tissue in mice. If proven effective in patients, the method could make complete surgical removal of brain tumors more feasible.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: Elizabeth Morris
In the O.R.
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Allyson Collins, MS
Friday, March 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering is the first and only hospital in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to offer a new, more patient-friendly approach for doctors to precisely pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 13, 2012

In a large-scale genome-sequencing study, researchers have discovered mutations in neuroblastoma tumors that could aid the development of diagnostic tests and therapies.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, March 8, 2012

Findings from a multidisciplinary research team led by Memorial Sloan Kettering medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok could help shed light on the immune system’s role in fighting cancer.

Pictured: Ann Zauber
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Julie Grisham, MS
Thursday, February 23, 2012

For the first time, a new study has shown that removing polyps by colonoscopy not only prevents colorectal cancer from developing, but also prevents deaths from the disease.

Pictured: Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies provide new clues about genetic mutations that affect cell behavior and play a role in several types of cancer.

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