Cancer Guide
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 17, 2014

Molecular analysis of lung tumors can help guide treatment decisions. Memorial Sloan Kettering is one of only a handful of centers nationwide to offer this personalized approach to care.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Mary Jane Massie & Tari King
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 7, 2014

Increasingly, women diagnosed with cancer in one breast are choosing to have their other, healthy breast removed, but experts say this additional surgery provides no survival benefits.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit, Alexandra Heerdt, Emily Glogowski & Max Gomez
Video
By Helen Garey, MPH, Freelance Writer  |  Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Cancer genetics experts say the discovery of the BRCA gene mutations has transformed the way doctors prevent and treat hereditary cancers.

Pictured: Julio Garcia-Aguilar
Ask the Expert
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Tuesday, March 25, 2014

In this Ask the Expert feature, colorectal surgeon Julio Garcia-Aguilar discusses the differences between laparoscopy and robotic surgery and explains which patients are the best candidates for these procedures.

Pictured: Sandra D’Angelo
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, March 21, 2014

Medical oncologist Sandra D’Angelo, who specializes in caring for patients with rare cancers such as melanoma, soft tissue sarcoma, and Merkel cell carcinoma, talks about the team approach and the importance of empowering patients.

Pictured: Richard Steingart
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Cancer treatments, both traditional treatments and newer targeted therapies, can lead to short-term and long-term heart problems.

Pictured: José Baselga
HONOR
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Tuesday, March 18, 2014

As leader of the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research, Dr. Baselga will expand his role in accelerating cancer prevention and discovery.

Pictured: Kathryn Beal
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 17, 2014

A high-dose radiation treatment that can be given in one day has become an effective and increasingly common approach for patients with metastatic brain tumors.

Pictured: George Plitas
Perspective
By George Plitas, MD  |  Friday, March 14, 2014

The correct identification and naming of a tumor’s type is increasingly important in the era of personalized medicine, and tumors that exhibit features of more than one type can complicate that process.

Vincent Laudone
Perspective
By Vincent Laudone, MD, Co-Director for Robotic Surgery  |  Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Our conversation about active surveillance of prostate cancer continues. Let’s take a closer look at our protocols for selecting and monitoring patients.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

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