Pictured: Sandra D’Angelo
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, March 21, 2014

Medical oncologist Sandra D’Angelo, who specializes in caring for patients with rare cancers such as melanoma, soft tissue sarcoma, and Merkel cell carcinoma, talks about the team approach and the importance of empowering patients.

Pictured: Diane Reidy
Feature
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Cycle for Survival, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s nationwide indoor team cycling event, helps support research into rare cancers. Three researchers discuss how these funds benefit their research.

Pictured: Low-dose CT scans
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 26, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual report on top clinical cancer advances of the year once again features several studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Pictured: T cells
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 23, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have played a major role in cancer immunotherapy research, named “Breakthrough of the Year” by Science magazine.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok & Richard Carvajal
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 3, 2013

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies that hold promise for the treatment of advanced uveal (eye) melanoma and advanced skin melanoma are making headlines at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Pictured: Melanocytes
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed innovative ways to study some skin diseases, including melanoma skin cancer.

Pictured: Liang Deng
Profile
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 26, 2013

Physician-scientist Liang Deng cares for patients with melanoma and other skin cancers, and also conducts innovative research on poxviruses.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 4, 2013

Early research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering cautions against combining ipilimumab and vemurafenib for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Paul Chapman
Finding
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, December 7, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts add to their knowledge of vemurafenib, a drug recently approved by the FDA to treat some patients with metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Ping Chi
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 2, 2012

Dr. Chi, a physician-scientist and member of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, studies genetic and epigenetic changes that cause cancer.

Pictured: Patient James
Patient Story
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 15, 2012

James had advanced melanoma and dwindling treatment options when his doctors enrolled him in a clinical trial of an innovative immunotherapy developed at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, March 8, 2012

Findings from a multidisciplinary research team led by Memorial Sloan Kettering medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok could help shed light on the immune system’s role in fighting cancer.

Pictured: Memorial Sloan Kettering logo
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, February 6, 2012

Two of the year’s top five cancer research advances cited by the American Society of Clinical Oncology were led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators.

Finding
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 23, 2012

Research has shown that children who have experienced a sunburn at an early age are at almost double the risk for developing melanoma in adulthood. Now, a new study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering epidemiologist Stephen Dusza finds that most children do not regularly use sunscreen.

Center News

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