Pictured: Johanna Joyce
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, August 19, 2014

A new study sheds light on what enables breast cancer cells to spread to the brain and presents a potential target for drugs.

In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 11, 2014

Experimental pathologist Jorge Reis-Filho explains how tumor DNA obtained from the blood could lead to noninvasive — yet highly sensitive — ways of detecting and monitoring cancer in the body.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 28, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Serge Lyashchenko
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, June 27, 2014

The launch of a 20-ton instrument and a facility for producing radioactive imaging molecules will allow our doctors and scientists to monitor cancers in unparalleled detail.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Jason Lewis, Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis & Daniel Heller
Announcement
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 12, 2014

The new center brings together scientists and clinicians working in various fields who will use the power of imaging to speed research and innovations in cancer care.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Craig Thompson & Paul Marks
Announcement
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Former leader of Memorial Sloan Kettering Paul Marks gives a compelling view of cancer research and treatment over the past 40 years in On the Cancer Frontier: One Man, One Disease, and a Medical Revolution.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Daniel Heller
Video
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 27, 2014

The research team of chemist and engineer Daniel Heller creates new nanoscale materials that are specially designed to improve biological research or solve clinical problems.

Pictured: George Plitas
Perspective
By George Plitas, MD  |  Friday, March 14, 2014

The correct identification and naming of a tumor’s type is increasingly important in the era of personalized medicine, and tumors that exhibit features of more than one type can complicate that process.

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