Cancer genomics researcher Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 16, 2015

According to an MSK study, a powerful immunotherapy drug for lung cancer works better in people whose tumors carry a lot of mutations caused by tobacco smoke.

Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Learn about five hot science areas that are changing the way we understand and treat cancer.

CAR T cell immunotherapy
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Cell therapies that use patients’ own immune cells to attack cancer are a promising and rapidly growing area of research.

In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

An annual report from an influential cancer group highlights three MSK studies that have advanced cancer research.

Sandra D’Angelo and Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, January 6, 2015

A new treatment for advanced melanoma is the latest promising advance in immunotherapy tested in large part by our scientists.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok, Alexandra Snyder Charen and Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 20, 2014

In people with melanoma who respond to the drug ipilimumab, certain mutations make tumors more visible to the immune system.

Michel Sadelain and Prasad Adusumilli
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 19, 2014

A study in mouse models suggests how modified T cells may be used to treat tumors in the area just outside the lungs.

Pictured: Joao Xavier & Eric Pamer
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 10, 2014

Clostridium difficile infections are a growing problem, but MSK researchers are looking for innovative ways to prevent and treat them.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 21, 2014

MSK researchers discover that the body senses and attacks harmful bacteria indirectly after the pathogens cause stress within the cells.

Pictured: Experimental Brain Tumor
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 18, 2014

Researchers have engineered a gene into therapeutic cells that allows them to turn off tumor growth if some of the cells become cancerous.

Pictured: Richard O’Reilly
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 31, 2014

A study shows that treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with stem cell transplantation is very effective, especially if done early.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
MSK at ASCO
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Our experts offer their perspective in major media outlets on recent research into drug- and cell-based immunotherapies for cancer.

Pictured: Helen McArthur
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The treatment combines a technique called cryoablation, or freezing of the tumor, with an immunotherapy drug.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the News
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 2, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientist Jedd Wolchok describes striking advances in cancer immunotherapy in New York Times and Scientific American.

Center News

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