Pictured: Experimental Brain Tumor
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 18, 2014

Researchers have engineered a gene into therapeutic cells that allows them to turn off tumor growth if some of the cells become cancerous.

Pictured: Richard O’Reilly
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 31, 2014

A study shows that treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with stem cell transplantation is very effective, especially if done early.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
MSK at ASCO
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Our experts offer their perspective in major media outlets on recent research into drug- and cell-based immunotherapies for cancer.

Pictured: Helen McArthur
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The treatment combines a technique called cryoablation, or freezing of the tumor, with an immunotherapy drug.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the News
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 2, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientist Jedd Wolchok describes striking advances in cancer immunotherapy in New York Times and Scientific American.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Susan Prockop & Lucas T.
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 6, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientists have prevented a dangerous complication of stem cell transplantation using immune cells donated from a third party.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok & Alexander Rudensky
Announcement
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 6, 2014

Immunologist Alexander Rudensky and medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok are investigating innovative ways to use the immune system to fight cancer.

Pictured: T cells
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 23, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have played a major role in cancer immunotherapy research, named “Breakthrough of the Year” by Science magazine.

Pictured: Alexander Rudensky
Profile
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Monday, December 16, 2013

Alexander Rudensky’s research focuses on the role of a subset of white blood cells called regulatory T cells, which are believed to suppress the immune system’s ability to fight tumors.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
In the News
By Christina Pernambuco-Holsten, MA  |  Friday, December 6, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s partnership in a pioneering effort to speed the development of cancer immunotherapies drew national headlines.

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