Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, Eileen O’Reilly, Steven Leach, and Peter Allen
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 26, 2014

Our new David M. Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research is an ambitious initiative to solve a difficult and complex disease.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: David Solit
Profile
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 27, 2014

David Solit, Director of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, discusses how working with cancer patients drives him to develop more-effective, personalized cancer treatments.

Pictured: Mark Kris
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, May 21, 2014

A new study has found that driver mutations can be found in about two-thirds of lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting options for treatment with targeted therapies.

Pictured: José Baselga, Agnès Viale,  Michael Berger & David Solit
Announcement
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 20, 2014

With the creation of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering sets out to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine by creating better treatment options for all people with cancer.

pictured: Martin S. Tallman
Profile
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Monday, May 19, 2014

Leukemia Specialist Martin Tallman discusses how research has led to improvements in the treatment of leukemia and what challenges remain.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Diane Reidy
Feature
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Cycle for Survival, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s nationwide indoor team cycling event, helps support research into rare cancers. Three researchers discuss how these funds benefit their research.

Finding
By Jenifer Goodwin, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, February 6, 2014

Investigators have found a possible molecular explanation for why obese people with kidney cancer tend to fare better despite having a higher rate of diagnosis.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

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