(From left) MSK investigators Michael Berger, José Baselga, and Maurizio Scaltriti, and graduate student Pau Castel.
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 17, 2014

A study of one patient’s disease has clarified why tumors stop responding to a class of experimental drugs called PI3K inhibitors.

Pictured: William Lee, Chris Sander & Nils Weinhold
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 13, 2014

In a study of patient tumor samples, researchers have found common mutations in parts of the genome that control gene regulation.

Gregory Riely
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 12, 2014

MSK lung cancer patients benefit from a powerful genomic test that looks for mutations in 341 genes to help determine the best treatment.

Cancer biologist Andrea Ventura
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 6, 2014

For the first time, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists have created a mouse model that replicates a subtype of non-small cell lung cancer caused by a chromosomal rearrangement — a type of mutation that is common in cancers but thus far has been very difficult to study.

A student asks a question at last year’s "Major Trends” seminar.
Event
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 3, 2014

Every year, MSK gives high school students and their teachers the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge biomedical research from our scientists.

RISE Program Clinical Director Debra Mangino discusses next steps with a patient.
In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, October 31, 2014

The team of experts in our RISE Program tailor each woman’s surveillance plan based on the latest findings in breast cancer risk, prevention, and treatment.

Pictured: Jorge Reis-Filho and Britta Weigelt
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Genetic alterations linked to a rare salivary cancer could also shed light on more common malignancies.

DNA wrapped around histones
Decoder
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Physician-scientist Omar Abdel-Wahab explains epigenetics, a growing field based on the study of genetic changes that are not part of the DNA code, and how it relates to cancer.

Pictured: Ping Chi
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 9, 2014

Genetic analysis reveals biomarkers and possible drug targets for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have created tiny structures called organoids from patients’ prostate tumors. These organoids will allow the study of tumors in greater detail and enable correlation of genetic mutations with drug response.

Pictured: Johanna Joyce
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, August 19, 2014

A new study sheds light on what enables breast cancer cells to spread to the brain and presents a potential target for drugs.

In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 11, 2014

Experimental pathologist Jorge Reis-Filho explains how tumor DNA obtained from the blood could lead to noninvasive — yet highly sensitive — ways of detecting and monitoring cancer in the body.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

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