Pictured: Viviane Tabar
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 1, 2014

Investigators have created the first-ever genetically engineered model of cancer made from human embryonic stem cells in culture.

A student asks a question at last year’s "Major Trends” seminar.
Event
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 3, 2014

Every year, MSK gives high school students and their teachers the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge biomedical research from our scientists.

Pictured: Experimental Brain Tumor
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 18, 2014

Researchers have engineered a gene into therapeutic cells that allows them to turn off tumor growth if some of the cells become cancerous.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Vivian Tabar
Profile
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Monday, February 17, 2014

Viviane Tabar performs complex surgeries for patients with brain tumors and, outside the operating room, focuses on the relationship between stem cells and brain cancers.

Pictured: Stem cell-derived nerve cells exposed to progerin
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Monday, December 30, 2013

A team of Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists has come up with an approach to make stem-cell-derived neurons rapidly age in a cell culture dish. The breakthrough could transform research into Parkinson’s and other late-onset diseases.

Pictured: Melanocytes
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed innovative ways to study some skin diseases, including melanoma skin cancer.

Pictured: Lorenz Studer
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Methods to generate stem cells have given scientists new ways to study some diseases and identify potential drugs, and could one day be used to rebuild diseased or damaged tissues in patients.

Pictured: Neural stem cells
Philanthropy
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, May 11, 2012

Research at Memorial Sloan Kettering will benefit from renewed support for The Starr Cancer Consortium and the Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative totaling $105 million.

Pictured: Michael Kharas
Profile
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 11, 2012

As a child, Michael Kharas knew that he wanted to “be making the drugs doctors use to cure people.” Today he investigates molecular processes that stem cells and tumor cells have in common – in the hopes of uncovering insights for treatments for cancer and other diseases.

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