Sandra D’Angelo and Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, January 6, 2015

A new treatment for advanced melanoma is the latest promising advance in immunotherapy tested in large part by our scientists.

Stained pathology slides of a patient’s tumor (right) and of an organoid made from that tumor (left).
In the Lab
By Christina Pernambuco-Holsten, MA, Managing Web Editor  |  Tuesday, December 30, 2014

From tropical plants and 3-D snapshots of worms to tiny particles that light up tumors, here’s a glimpse at some of the fascinating work MSK researchers pursued in 2014 as part of our quest to advance cancer science.

Pictured: Eytan Stein
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 11, 2014

An experimental drug for blood cancers with certain genetic mutations is showing promise in early-stage trials.

Cancer biologist Andrea Ventura
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 6, 2014

For the first time, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists have created a mouse model that replicates a subtype of non-small cell lung cancer caused by a chromosomal rearrangement — a type of mutation that is common in cancers but thus far has been very difficult to study.

A student asks a question at last year’s "Major Trends” seminar.
Event
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 3, 2014

Every year, MSK gives high school students and their teachers the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge biomedical research from our scientists.

Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 20, 2014

Medical oncologist Paul Sabbatini demystifies common misconceptions surrounding clinical trials.

DNA wrapped around histones
Decoder
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Physician-scientist Omar Abdel-Wahab explains epigenetics, a growing field based on the study of genetic changes that are not part of the DNA code, and how it relates to cancer.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.

Pictured: Paul Sabbatini
Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Medical oncologist Paul Sabbatini sheds light on how phase I clinical trials are conducted at Memorial Sloan Kettering and how to determine whether patients may be eligible for one.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have created tiny structures called organoids from patients’ prostate tumors. These organoids will allow the study of tumors in greater detail and enable correlation of genetic mutations with drug response.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 28, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

Pictured: Gabriela Chiosis
Finding
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Thursday, July 17, 2014

A small molecule discovered at MSK called PU-H71 blocks the growth of cancer cells and enables doctors to image tumors.

Pictured: Daniel Heller
Video
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 27, 2014

The research team of chemist and engineer Daniel Heller creates new nanoscale materials that are specially designed to improve biological research or solve clinical problems.

Pictured: Michael Foley
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Thursday, December 5, 2013

A renowned chemist with 25 years of industry and academic experience, Michael Foley will lead a pioneering collaboration designed to speed the development of new drugs for people with cancer and other diseases.

Pictured: Clifford Hudis
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, November 1, 2013

Medical oncologist Clifford Hudis says advances in immunology and molecular biology are leading to remarkable successes in cancer treatment.

Center News

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