In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Obesity in patients with early-stage tongue cancer has been linked to a five-fold increase in the risk of death.

Pictured: Andrew Vickers
Finding
By Allyson Collins, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 17, 2013

A study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators indicates nearly half of all prostate cancer deaths by age 75 occur in a small group of men with high PSA levels at age 45.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 28, 2013

A study identifies genetic variations that alter the risk of breast cancer in women who have a certain gene mutation.

In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 11, 2012

In the most rigorous analysis of its kind to date, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers find acupuncture to be an effective therapy for several types of pain.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Finding
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor and Irene Jarchum, PhD
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Pictured: Chaya Moskowitz
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 4, 2012

A new study confirms that female childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation to the chest have a high risk of developing breast cancer at a young age – a risk that is comparable to that of women who have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

Pictured: Ann Zauber
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Julie Grisham, MS
Thursday, February 23, 2012

For the first time, a new study has shown that removing polyps by colonoscopy not only prevents colorectal cancer from developing, but also prevents deaths from the disease.

Finding
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 23, 2012

Research has shown that children who have experienced a sunburn at an early age are at almost double the risk for developing melanoma in adulthood. Now, a new study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering epidemiologist Stephen Dusza finds that most children do not regularly use sunscreen.

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