Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Pictured: Stephen Solomon
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 27, 2014

Irreversible electroporation – a new, minimally invasive treatment that uses electric current to poke tiny holes in cell membranes – is showing promise against hard-to-treat tumors.

In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Obesity in patients with early-stage tongue cancer has been linked to a five-fold increase in the risk of death.

Pictured: Alice Ho
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 20, 2014

A new approach for treating breast cancer spreads radiation doses over a larger number of beams, providing more thorough coverage.

Pictured: Low-dose CT scans
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 26, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual report on top clinical cancer advances of the year once again features several studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Pictured: Oliver Zivanovic, Garrett Nash & Dennis Chi
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts are leading investigations of a procedure called hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, also known as HIPEC.

Pictured: Lawrence Dauer
In the O.R.
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering clinicians report on a successful first year of using a new procedure to pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Robert J. Motzer
In the Clinic
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, August 22, 2013

An international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering found that pazopanib (Votrient®) controls cancer as effectively as sunitinib (Sutent®) while improving patients’ quality of life.

Pictured: Micropapillary Morphology
In the Lab
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 9, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study shows that an abnormal cell pattern found in the tumor tissue of some lung cancer patients may help to predict which tumors are more likely to recur after surgery.

In the Clinic
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, June 19, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study suggests that lymphedema of the arm, a swelling that can occur following breast cancer treatment, may be reduced by acupuncture.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok & Richard Carvajal
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 3, 2013

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies that hold promise for the treatment of advanced uveal (eye) melanoma and advanced skin melanoma are making headlines at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Pictured: Paul Russo
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, May 20, 2013

A study has found that the majority of kidney cancer patients with small tumors have their entire kidney removed, which can increase the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.

Pictured: Gary Schwartz & Mark Dickson
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 22, 2013

Two clinical trials of targeted therapies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators show promising results against different types of sarcoma.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 4, 2013

Early research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering cautions against combining ipilimumab and vemurafenib for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

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