Pictured: Nematode Worm Embryo
Snapshot
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, September 11, 2014

Stunning movies captured in the lab of computational biologist Zhirong Bao reveal how cells divide, grow, and move around, as in a carefully choreographed dance, during the development of a nematode worm embryo.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Liver Cells
Decoder
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 16, 2014

Cell biologist Michael Overholtzer explains apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death that can lead to cancer when it doesn’t function properly.

Pictured: Jason Lewis, Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis & Daniel Heller
Announcement
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 12, 2014

The new center brings together scientists and clinicians working in various fields who will use the power of imaging to speed research and innovations in cancer care.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Casper zebrafish
Snapshot
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Physician and cell biologist Richard White has generated a transparent and stripeless strain of zebrafish to study how tumors develop the capacity to metastasize to new organs.

Pictured: Emily Foley
Profile
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Friday, October 18, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering cell biologist Emily Foley discusses her research, which is focused on improving the understanding of cell division.

Pictured: James E. Rothman, Thomas C. Südhof & Randy W. Schekman
Honor
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 14, 2013

James Rothman, who receives this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with Randy Schekman and Thomas Südhof, conducted more than a decade of his seminal research at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.