Colin Begg, PhD

Chairman, Attending Biostatistician
Office Phone:
646-735-8108
Office Fax:
646-735-0009
E-mail:
beggc@mskcc.org
Education:
University of Glasgow, UK

Current Research Interests

Dr. Begg is interested in cancer epidemiology, health services research, clinical trials, and the statistical methods that support scientific studies in these disciplines.  In recent years he has been pursuing the idea that cancer risk can be uniquely informed by studying patients with multiple primary malignancies. Currently his work on this topic is focused on three areas. In the first, he is developing models for estimating the cancer risks of rare genetic variants. In the second area he has been developing statistical techniques for clonality assessment, used to distinguish independent second primary cancers from metastases on the basis of the somatic molecular profiles of the tumors. In the third area of investigation, he is developing methods for using somatic profiles of double primary malignancies to make inferences of about the etiologic heterogeneity of tumor sub-types. He collaborates closely with various other members of the department on these projects, notably Drs Bernstein, Capanu, Ostrovnaya and Seshan.

Mutations that cause cancer: A Q&A session with Drs. Marinela Capanu and Colin Begg

Publications by Colin Begg

Begg CB, Haile RW, Borg A, Malone KE, Concannon P, Thomas DC, Langholz B, Bernstein L, Olsen JH, Lynch CF, Anton-Culver H, Capanu M, Liang X, Hummer AJ, Sima C, Bernstein JL. Variation of breast cancer risk among BRCA1/2 carriers: An investigation by the WECARE Study Group. JAMA 2008; 299:194-201. [PubMed Abstract]

Capanu M, Begg CB. Hierarchical modeling for estimating relative risks of rare genetic variants: properties of the pseudo-likelihood method. Biometrics 2011;67:371-380. [PubMed Abstract]

Begg, CB. A strategy for distinguishing optimal cancer subtypes. International Journal of Cancer 2011;129:931-937. [PubMed Abstract]

Ostrovnaya I, Seshan VE, Olshen A, Begg CB. Clonality: an R package for testing clonal relatedness of two tumors from the same patient based on their genomic profiles. Bioinformatics 2011;27:1698-1699. [PubMed Abstract]

Begg CB, Zabor E. Detecting and exploiting etiologic heterogeneity in epidemiologic studies. American Journal of Epidemiology 2012 (in press).