Improving Your Memory

This information provides tips to help you improve your memory.

Use Mnemonics

Mneumonics (new-mon-iks) are a way to help you remember information. For example, to remember that the word dessert has 2 s’s, you can think that most people want 2 servings of dessert. To spell luggage, connect it with the phrase ”Get a good grip on your luggage.” You may remember the days in a month by saying “30 days hath September, April, June, and November.” Another tip to help you remember thins is by using the first letter of a phrase. This is called an acronym. A commonly used acronym is TGIF for “thank goodness it’s Friday.” With practice, you’ll be able to use your own mnemonics to remember things that are important to you.

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Picture Things in Your Mind

Picture in your mind what you were doing when you last remember having something you’re looking for. For example, ”I came into the house, hung up my coat, and began to go through the mail.” You know you had your briefcase with you when you came into the house, but can’t remember where you put it. Ask yourself the following questions: Did I put it in the closet when I hung up my coat? Did I put it in the room where I looked at the mail?

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Start Making Routines

Doing the same thing every time can help you remember. For example, always keep your keys in one place. If you decide to keep your keys in the kitchen, put them in a specific location in the kitchen. Do chores in the same order everyday. For example, put yesterday’s newspapers in the recycle bin on your way out first thing in the morning. Keep a list of household things you run out of and add to it as you use the last of something. This way you will have a list when you go to the grocery store, for example. Write the location of your car on the parking lot ticket, or connect the level and aisle with something familiar (level 3 = 3 grandchildren; aisle b = Boston). If you always do these things, they’ll become habit and you won’t have to remember them.

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