Our Mission Is Discovery

For more than 70 years, the Sloan Kettering Institute has set the pace for cancer science.

Our Research 

The Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI) is the experimental research arm of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Discoveries made in SKI labs are an important driver of clinical progress at MSK and beyond. Our research spans nine program areas: 

Laboratories

Find a researcher from one of our labs.

This Is SKI

Discover how we do cancer science.

A Collaborative Approach 

Collaboration is a hallmark of the research enterprise at SKI. Our scientists collaborate across programs, across disciplines, and across institutions.

Collaborative Research Centers
Researchers from SKI and Memorial Hospital join forces in 23 established Collaborative Research Centers. These innovative centers bring together laboratory scientists and clinicians to spark innovation.

Joint Graduate Programs
SKI enjoys close relationships with neighbors Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medicine, and partners with them in several joint graduate programs.

Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute
This innovative partnership between MSK, Rockefeller, Weill Cornell, and industry aims to speed the translation of basic scientific discoveries into promising new medicines.

The Center for Cancer Systems Immunology brings together faculty from across the Sloan Kettering Institute, such as Alexander Rudensky (left) and Christina Leslie (right).

Immunologist Alexander Rudensky (right) directs the Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, one of the collaborative research centers that makes SKI an exciting place to do science.

Featured News & Events

In this fluorescent microscopy image of endoderm tissue from a mouse embryo, cell membranes are red, cell nuclei are blue, and extra-embryonic endoderm cells are green (they appear turquoise because blue and green are merged).

In the Lab

Scientists Rewrite the Textbook of Organ Development, One Cell at a Time

A large study that analyzed nearly 120,000 cells in a developing mouse embryo is full of surprises.

A cartoon depicting a cleaning crew

In th Lab

Cellular “Garbage Collectors” Are Key to Cancer’s Growth

A new study suggests a way to target cancer by interfering with its system of waste removal.

3D organelle

In the Lab

This Newly Discovered Organelle Is Fierce

It’s not every day that scientists discover a new part of the cell. Two biologists from the Sloan Kettering Institute just did.

An illustration shows Helios, the ancient Greek sun god, unwinding DNA

In the Lab

Something New Under the Sun: Study in Leukemia Finds Role for Helios Protein

MSK researchers have found that a protein that contributes to one type of leukemia when it’s missing can lead to the formation of a different leukemia type when it’s present.