Understanding your FibroScan® Results

This information will help you understand your FibroScan® results.

About FibroScan

FibroScan is a specialized ultrasound machine for your liver. It measures fibrosis (scarring) and steatosis (fatty change) in your liver. Fatty change is when fat builds up in your liver cells.

FibroScan will help your healthcare provider learn more about your liver disease. It can be used alone or with other tests (such as blood tests, imaging scans, or biopsies) that also measure scarring or fatty change in your liver.

Your FibroScan Results

Date: __________

FibroScan steatosis result (CAP score): _______________ decibels per meter (dB/m)
     Steatosis grade: _______________

FibroScan fibrosis result: _______________ kilopascals (kPa)
     Fibrosis score: _______________

Your healthcare provider will talk with you about your results during your appointment. If you have questions, call your doctor’s office. You can reach them Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at 212-639-7336.

The rest of this resource explains your FibroScan results in more detail, including how your healthcare provider uses your results to determine your steatosis grade and fibrosis score. You can read the sections below if you’d like to learn more.

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About Your CAP Score

Your CAP score is a measurement of fatty change in your liver. Your healthcare provider will use your CAP score to find out your steatosis grade.

The CAP score is measured in decibels per meter (dB/m). It ranges from 100 to 400 dB/m. The table below shows ranges of CAP scores and the matching steatosis grade and amount of fatty change.

CAP Score Steatosis Grade Amount of Liver with Fatty Change
238 to 260 dB/m S1 11 to 33%
260 to 290 dB/m S2 34 to 66%
Higher than 290 dB/m S3 67% or more
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About Your Fibrosis Result

Your fibrosis result is a measurement of the amount of scarring in your liver. FibroScan measures scarring by measuring the stiffness of your liver.

The fibrosis result is measured in kilopascals (kPa) It’s normally between 2 and 6 kPa. The highest possible result is 75 kPa. Many people with liver disease(s) have a result that’s higher than the normal range.

Your healthcare provider will use your FibroScan fibrosis result and your medical history to determine your fibrosis score.

  • Fibrosis score F0 to F1: No liver scarring or mild liver scarring
  • Fibrosis score F2: Moderate liver scarring
  • Fibrosis score F3: Severe liver scarring
  • Fibrosis score F4: Advanced liver scarring (cirrhosis)

Using your FibroScan fibrosis result to estimate your fibrosis score

The table below shows liver diseases, ranges of fibrosis results, and the matching fibrosis score. The ranges of fibrosis results in the table are estimates. This means that your actual fibrosis score (the score that your healthcare provider tells you) may not match the fibrosis score in the table. If you have more than one liver disease, you may not be able to use the table.

To use the table, find the liver disease that you have on the left side of the table. Read across the row from left to right until you find the range that includes your fibrosis result. Then, look at the top of that column to see the fibrosis score.

  F0 to F1 F2 F3 F4
Hepatitis B 2 to 7 kPa 8 to 9 kPa 8 to 11kPa 18 kPa or higher
Hepatitis C 2 to 7 kPa 8 to 9 kPa 9 to 14 kPa 14 kPa or higher
HIV/HCV Coinfection 2 to 7 kPa 7 to 11 kPa 11 to 14 kPa 14 kPa or higher
Cholestatic Disease 2 to 7 kPa 7 to 9 kPa 9 to 17 kPa 17 kPa or higher
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD or NASH) 2 to 7 kPa 7.5 to 10 kPa 10 to 14 kPa 14 kPa or higher
Alcohol Related Disease 2 to 7 kPa 7 to 11 kPa 11 to 19 kPa 19 kPa or higher

Your fibrosis result may be over-estimated (your liver may have less scarring than what your fibrosis result says) if you have:

  • Liver inflammation. This can be caused by a recent liver illness or drinking alcohol.
  • Benign (not cancerous) or cancerous tumors in your liver.
  • Liver congestion (when your liver is too full of blood or other fluids). This is usually caused by heart failure.

Your FibroScan results may also be less accurate if you have:

  • A body mass index (BMI) higher than 30 (obesity)
  • A build-up of fluid in your abdomen (ascites)
  • Too little bile flowing out of your liver (biliary obstruction)
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