How to Care for Your Eyes During Your Treatment with Tisotumab (Tivdak™)

This information explains how to care for your eyes during your treatment with tisotumab (tye-SOT-uh-mab) at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK).

Tisotumab is a medication used to treat cervical cancer. It can cause changes to the surface of your eyes, which can lead to:

  • Dry eyes
  • Eye redness
  • Eye irritation
  • Corneal ulcers (sores on the surface of your eye)
  • Blurred vision
  • Vision loss

These eye problems can be serious. If you start to have vision changes or eye problems during your treatment, tell your MSK care team, your eye specialist, or both. If you already have vision changes or eye problems, tell them if they get worse.

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Getting Ready for Your Treatment

Tisotumab is given as a series of infusions. An infusion is when a medication is put into your vein slowly over a period of time. You’ll have an intravenous (IV) line placed for your infusions.

You’ll need to do the following things to get ready for your first tisotumab infusion.

Visit an eye specialist

Your MSK healthcare provider will refer you to an eye specialist. They will check your eyes to make sure it’s safe for you to start treatment.

You must also visit the eye specialist:

  • Before each of your tisotumab infusions.
  • If you start having eye problems.
  • If your eye problems are getting worse.

Pick up prescription eye drops

Your healthcare provider will prescribe 3 types of eye drops.

  • Vasoconstrictor (brimonidine) eye drops. These make the blood vessels in your eyes tighten (constrict). This helps lower the pressure in your eyes.
  • Steroid (dexamethasone) eye drops. These help reduce inflammation (such as redness and blurred vision) and irritation in your eyes.
  • Lubricating eye drops. These help add moisture to your eyes. This helps prevent and manage eye irritation and dryness.

These eye drops will help lower your risk of having eye problems during your treatment. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for using them. Bring your eye drops to each of your tisotumab infusion appointments.

Buy cooling eye masks

Buy 3 cooling eye masks to use during your tisotumab infusions. You can find them online or at your local supermarket or pharmacy. The masks must cover your eyes completely. Do not buy masks with eye holes (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. Buy a mask that covers your eyes completely

Figure 1. Buy a mask that covers your eyes completely

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During Your Treatment

You’ll need to cool your eye masks at home in your freezer. You’ll bring them to your tisotumab infusion appointments in a small cooler (such as an insulated lunch box) filled with frozen ice packs. If you do not have a small cooler or ice packs, buy them before your first infusion appointment.

Starting the day of your first tisotumab infusion:

  • Do not wear contact lenses unless your eye specialist tells you to. A member of your care team will tell you when it’s safe to start wearing them again.
  • Avoid irritating your eyes. For example, avoid rubbing your eyes. Be careful not to get anything in your eyes that should not be there, such as soap.
  • Use your lubricating eye drops every day, as often as you need to. Follow the instructions on the bottle. Keep using them for 30 days after your last tisotumab infusion.
  • Check your eyes for problems every day. If you notice any new problems or if any problems are getting worse, tell your MSK care team, your eye specialist, or both.
  • Keep track of your eye drops so you do not run out. If you’re getting close to running out, tell your healthcare provider. They’ll refill your prescription.

The day of each tisotumab infusion

Bring the following things to every one of your infusion appointments:

  • Your vasoconstrictor eye drops.
  • Your steroid eye drops.
  • Your lubricating eye drops.
  • 3 cooling eye masks. Make sure they’re frozen.

‌  If you do not bring all these things to your appointment, you will not be able to get your tisotumab infusion.


 

Before your infusion

  • Put a cooling eye mask over your eyes about 10 minutes before your infusion starts.
  • Use your vasoconstrictor eye drops just before your infusion starts. Put 3 drops in each eye. Your nurse will help you.
  • Use your steroid eye drops just before your infusion starts. Put 1 drop in each eye. Your nurse will help you.

If your healthcare provider gives you other instructions, follow those instead.

During your infusion

  • Keep a cooling eye mask over your eyes during your whole infusion. When one starts to get to room temperature, switch it out for another one.

After your infusion

  • Keep a cooling eye mask over your eyes for about 20 minutes after your infusion is finished.
  • Use your steroid eye drops 2 more times over the rest of the day, a few hours apart. Each time, put 1 drop in each eye.
  • Use your lubricating eye drops as often as you need to.

You don’t need to wait between the steroid eye drops and lubricating eye drops. You can use the lubricating drops right before or after the steroid drops, if you need to.

If your healthcare provider gives you other instructions, follow those instead.

The day after each tisotumab infusion

  • Use your steroid eye drops 3 times today, several hours apart. For example, you could use them in the morning, around noon, and in the evening. Each time, put 1 drop in each eye.
  • Use your lubricating eye drops as often as you need to. You don’t need to wait between the steroid eye drops and lubricating eye drops.

If your healthcare provider gives you other instructions, follow those instead.

2 days after each tisotumab infusion

  • Use your steroid eye drops 3 times today. Each time, put 1 drop in each eye.
  • Use your lubricating eye drops as often as you need to. You don’t need to wait between the steroid eye drops and lubricating eye drops.

If your healthcare provider gives you other instructions, follow those instead.

Between your tisotumab infusions

Keep using your lubricating eye drops as often as you need to.

Most people have a tisotumab infusion about every 3 weeks. You’ll visit an eye specialist within 7 days before each of your infusions. They’ll check your eyes and help you manage any problems you’re having. If you do not visit the eye specialist before each of your tisotumab infusions, you will not be able to get the infusion.

Remember to also tell your MSK care team, your eye specialist, or both if you start having eye problems or if your eye problems are getting worse.

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When to Call Your Healthcare Provider

Call a member of your MSK care team, your eye specialist, or both if you have any vision changes or eye problems. Examples include:

  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Itchy eyes
  • Eye pain
  • Blurred vision
  • Watery eyes
  • Dry eyes
  • Light sensitivity
  • Serious vision loss
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