I lead Memorial Sloan Kettering’s efforts in animal imaging with MRI. Our facility performs high-resolution, large-volume in vivo cancer screening in rodents and other animals, as well as other experimental MRI services.

My research interests include the development and application of new MRI, multi-nuclear spectroscopic imaging, and multi-modal imaging methods to aid in cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring, and in studying tumor hypoxia (oxygen deprivation), angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels that promote tumor growth), and tumor metabolism.

Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is well-suited for measuring in vivo tumor perfusion, which reveals abnormalities in the vasculature of a tumor. Understanding tumor perfusion can also help in interpreting other trace-based imaging methods, such as PET. New measurement and compartmental modeling methods are being developed for various imaging applications. We are also developing new multi-modal imaging methods to detect tumor hypoxia, such as co-registered MRI and PET.