Colorectal Cancer Nomograms

Our colorectal cancer nomograms are prediction tools designed to help patients and their physicians calculate the likely outcomes of their surgical treatment for colon cancer. Both of these nomograms are appropriate for patients who have undergone surgery for colon cancer, assuming that all of the primary cancer was completely removed during the original surgery.

All results from these tools should be discussed with a physician and understood in the context of each patient’s program of care. Results from our disease-free probability nomogram are based on data from patients treated at MSK, a large research institution with surgeons who perform a high volume of colon cancer procedures. Results from our overall survival probability prediction tool are based on data from 128,853 primary colon cancer patients reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, which collects data on cancer cases from various locations and sources throughout the United States.

Disease-Free Probability Following Surgery

Our disease-free probability nomogram is a tool designed to predict the likelihood of remaining free of colon cancer at five years and ten years after undergoing a complete resection (surgical removal of all cancerous tissue). It is appropriate for patients whose colon cancer had shown no evidence of metastasis, or spread beyond the colon, before surgery or at the time of surgery.

Overall Survival Probability Following Surgery

Our overall survival nomogram is a tool designed to predict the likelihood of surviving at least five years after undergoing a complete resection (surgical removal of all cancerous tissue) for colon cancer. It can produce three different estimates of varying accuracy, based on the amount of data included. By submitting more information, you will get a more accurate overall survival estimate.