Overall Survival Probability Following Surgery

Our overall survival nomogram is a tool designed to predict the likelihood of surviving at least five years after undergoing a complete resection (surgical removal of all cancerous tissue) for colon cancer. It can produce three different estimates of varying accuracy, based on the amount of data included. By submitting more information, you will get a more accurate overall survival estimate.

For a basic estimate of overall survival probability, you will need the following information:

  • T stage: The stage of the tumor penetration into the colon wall based on the TNM anatomic staging system
  • N stage: The stage of the tumor spread to nearby lymph nodes based on the TNM anatomic staging system

For a more accurate estimate, you will need:

  • T stage: The stage of the tumor penetration into the colon wall based on the TNM anatomic staging system
  • Number of positive lymph nodes: Value between 0 and 16
  • Total number of lymph nodes: Value between 0 and 45

For the most accurate estimate, you will need:

  • T stage: The stage of the tumor penetration into the colon wall based on the TNM anatomic staging system
  • Number of positive lymph nodes: Value between 0 and 16
  • Total number of lymph nodes: Value between 0 and 45
  • Grade/Differentiation: Poor, moderate, or well differentiated.
  • Age: Your age at the time of surgery
  • Sex: Male or female

Results produced by this tool are based on records from 128,853 primary colon cancer patients reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, which collects data on cancer cases from various locations and sources throughout the United States. All results must be understood in the context of each patient’s specific treatment plan. Patients and caregivers using this tool should discuss the result with the patient’s physician.

To gather the information required to use this nomogram, use our worksheet.

Enter Your Information

More on T staging
The T stages are part of the TNM Staging System, which uses TNM classifications to describe the extent of cancer in a patient's body. T describes the size of the tumor and whether it has invaded nearby tissue; N describes whether regional lymph nodes are involved and, if so, how extensively; and M describes whether distant metastasis (spread of cancer from one body part to another) is present. The system is maintained by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and is updated periodically.
Note: This prediction tool is only applicable to N stages N0, N1, N2a, and N2b.
More on N staging
The N stages are part of the TNM Staging System, which uses TNM classifications to describe the extent of cancer in a patient's body. T describes the size of the tumor and whether it has invaded nearby tissue; N describes whether regional lymph nodes are involved and, if so, how extensively; and M describes whether distant metastasis (spread of cancer from one body part to another) is present. The system is maintained by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and is updated periodically.
nodes (0 to 16)
What are lymph nodes?
Lymph nodes are rounded masses of tissue that act as filters for a fluid called lymph. Lymph nodes are located along lymphatic vessels, and they store lymphocytes (white blood cells).
nodes (0 to 45)
What is grade/differentiation?
Tumor grade/differentiation refers to the extent of abnormality of the cells when viewed under the microscope. Well-differentiated tumor cells resemble normal cells and tend to grow and spread at a slower rate than poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumor cells.
years (0 to 99)