About Your Intraocular Injection

This information describes what to expect before, during and after your intraocular injection (shot). In this resource, the words “you” and “your” refer to you or your child.

An intraocular injection is a way to give medication directly into the fluid inside your eye. Your doctor will explain to you which medication you’re getting during your procedure and why you’re getting it. The injection is done using a small syringe and a needle. Your eye will be numbed for this procedure.

Before Your Procedure

Children will receive anesthesia (medication to make you sleepy) for this procedure. If you’re getting anesthesia, the week before your appointment you will get a phone call or an email explaining your appointment time and when to stop eating and drinking.

Arrange for someone to take you home

You must have a responsible care partner take you home after your procedure. Make sure to plan this before the day of your procedure.

If you don’t have someone to take you home, call one of the agencies below. They will send someone to go home with you. There’s usually a charge for this service, and you will need to provide transportation.

Agencies in New York                                         Agencies in New Jersey
Partners in Care: 888-735-8913                                         Caring People: 877-227-4649
Caring People: 877-227-4649                                          

 

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The Day of Your Procedure

Things to remember

On the day of your procedure, wear your glasses. If you wear contact lenses, you will need to remove them before the procedure.

Bring a list of all the medications and supplements you’re taking, including over-the-counter medications (medications you buy without a prescription).

Where to go

Your procedure will take place at the Ophthalmology Suite in the main hospital. The closest entrance is at 425 East 67th Street, between First and York Avenues. Take the C elevators to the 3rd floor, and go to suite A330.

What to expect

Once you arrive at the hospital, doctors, nurses, and other staff members will ask you to state and spell your name and date of birth many times. This is for your safety. People with the same or similar name may be having procedures on the same day.

You will be examined by your healthcare team. You will have several eye exams and your healthcare team will take pictures of your eye. Your doctor will get your written consent for the procedure.

You will get eye drops to dilate (make bigger) your pupils, the black part of your eye. These drops may cause your vision to blur and cause some sensitivity to light. It may become hard to read and focus on objects that are close to you.

You will then be brought into the procedure room for your injection.

Adults

Once you’re in the procedure room, you will be helped onto a procedure table. You will be asked to confirm what procedure you’re having and which eye you’re having it done on. You will be given eye drops to numb your eye. Your eye and eyelid will be washed with a cleaning solution.

A plastic drape with a cut out for your eye will be placed over your face. A eyelid holder may be placed between your eyelids to hold your eye open during the procedure. You will be asked to focus on an object to position your eye. You will receive the injection. You will feel slight pressure but no pain.

Your doctor will look into your eye using a bright light and a hand held lens. Your eye and lid will be cleaned with saline.

Your procedure takes less than 5 minutes.

Children

You will breathe in anesthesia (medication to make you sleepy) through a mask. Once you’re asleep, you will have an eye exam performed by your ophthalmology team. Your eye and eyelid will be washed with a cleaning solution.

A plastic drape with a cut out for your eye will be placed over your face. An eyelid holder may be placed between your eyelids to hold them open during the procedure. You will then receive the injection. When the needle is removed, your doctor will use cryotherapy (freezing) to close the small hole at the site of the injection.

Your doctor will look into your eye using a bright light and a hand held lens. Your eye and lid will be cleaned with saline. You will have a numbing drop placed in your eye.

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After Your Procedure

  • Your eyesight may be blurry and it may be difficult to focus on objects close to you because of the eye drops you received. This will get better in a few hours.
  • You may see a wave-like image or a bubble in your path of vision as the medication settles in the fluid of the eye. This will also get better in a few hours.
  • You can eat and drink normally.
  • You can start wearing contact lenses 24 hours after you procedure.
  • Don’t drive the day of your procedure. You can begin driving the next day.

Side effects

  • You may see a small amount of blood at the site of the injection. This will make white part of your eye appear red.
  • You may have some swelling under your eyelid.
  • Your eye may be red and irritated.

All of your side effects should go away in about 1 week.

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Call Your Doctor or Nurse if You Have:

  • Pain that is uncontrolled by acetaminophen (Tylenol®)
  • Large amounts of blood in the eye
  • Decreased vision or loss of vision
  • Swelling that makes it hard to open your eye
  • Nausea,vomiting, or other difficulty tolerating food or liquids for children who received anesthesia

Contact Information

If you have any questions or concerns, contact your ophthalmology team. You can reach them Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at the numbers listed below.

Adult ophthalmology office: 212-639-7266

Pediatric ophthalmology office: 212-639-7232

After 5:00 pm, during the weekend, and on holidays, call 212-639-2000 and ask for the ophthalmology doctor on call. Additionally, you can try the numbers listed below:

Doctor:__________________ Telephone: _________________

Physician assistant:____________ Telephone: _______________

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