Inflammatory Breast Cancer

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If you or someone who know has been diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), we are here to answer your questions and explain your options for treatment. Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. Unlike other breast cancers, it does not start with a lump in the breast. Instead, IBC causes the breast to become red and swollen, often in just days or weeks. This happens because breast cancer cells can get trapped within lymph vessels, blocking the flow of lymph fluid and growing as small clusters under the skin. We see it more frequently in females who are under 50 years old, obese, and/or Black.

Inflammatory Breast Cancer: The Disease That Starts With a Rash on the Breast
Learn about Memorial Sloan Kettering's expertise in inflammatory breast cancer.

Because IBC is so rare, it is important that you see experts who are very experienced in diagnosing and treating this type of breast cancer. At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, we see more people with inflammatory breast cancer each year than most other institutions. We are internationally recognized and accessible both locally and beyond.

We know it can be challenging to come back and forth for appointments when you’re already overwhelmed with a diagnosis. That’s why at your first appointment at MSK, you will meet with the different members of your care team in one day. We will work with you to develop the best treatment plan for you, based on the latest scientific evidence. We will also evaluate whether you are eligible for a clinical trial and provide guidance if you want to enroll in one. Throughout your journey, our team of specialists will be with you.

The following clinical trials are open and recruiting IBC patients:

A Study Assessing the Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Breast Cancer

A Phase I Study of BAY 2701439 in People with HER2-Expressing Cancers

A Phase I Study of ZW49 in Inoperable or Metastatic HER2-Positive Cancers

A Phase III Study of Alpelisib in Combination with Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab in People with Breast Cancer

A Phase I Study of Rucaparib plus Radiation Therapy in Women with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Who Did Not Respond Completely to Presurgical Chemotherapy

Meet Our Team of Experts

Jacqueline F. Bromberg, MD, PhD
Jacqueline F. Bromberg
Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeon Audree Tadros
Audree B. Tadros

Jeanne A. Petrek Junior Faculty Chair

Memorial Sloan Kettering radiation oncologist Amy Xu
Amy Xu

Co-Director, Inpatient Radiation Oncology Consult (IROC) Service, Department of Radiation Oncology