Maroon Bush

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Maroon Bush

Common Names

  • Prickly fan-flower
  • Currant bush

For Patients & Caregivers

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How It Works

Maroon bush has not been studied in humans.

Maroon bush is a plant native to Australia where it is used in traditional medicine for colds, stomach ailments, and as a diuretic by the Aboriginal people. Lab studies have shown that it has antibacterial and antiviral activities, but it is not known whether it has anticancer effects in humans.

Purported Uses
  • Ulcers
    Evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Stomach ache
    Evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Colds
    Although used in traditional medicine, evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Cancer
    Although believed to have anticancer effects, evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Diuretic
    Maroon bush is used in traditional medicine as a diuretic, but evidence is lacking to support this claim.
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For Healthcare Professionals

Scientific Name
Scaevola spinescens
Clinical Summary

Maroon bush is a plant native to Australia where it is used in traditional medicine for colds, stomach ailments, and as a diuretic by the Aboriginal people. Flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids, anthraquinones, polysteroids, saponins, cardiac glycosides and phenolic compounds are among the constituents found in maroon bush (2) (3).

In vitro, the plant extracts demonstrated antibacterial and antiviral properties without toxic effects (1) (2). Infusions made from the leaves and branches are thought to have anticancer effects, leading to heightened interest in this plant as an alternative cancer treatment. However, human studies have yet to be conducted.

Purported Uses
  • Ulcers
  • Stomach ache
  • Diuretic
  • Colds
  • Cancer
References
  1. Semple SJ, Reynolds GD, O’Leary MC, Flower RL. Screening of Australian medicinal plants for antiviral activity. J Ethnopharmacol. 1998 Mar;60(2):163-72.
  2. Cock IE, Kukkonen L. An examination of the medicinal potential of Scaevola spinescens: Toxicity, antibacterial, and antiviral activities. Pharmacognosy Res. 2011 Apr;3(2):85-94.
  3. Kerr PG, Longmore RB, Betts TJ. Myricadiol and other taraxerenes from Scaevola spinescens. Planta Med. 1996 Dec;62(6):519-22.
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