Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

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Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

Common Names

  • Juzen-taiho-to
  • SQT
  • TJ-48
  • Sipjeondaebo-tang

For Patients & Caregivers

How It Works

Current evidence is insufficient to support use of Shi quan da bu tang for cancer treatment.

Shi quan da bu tang is an herbal formula that consists of Panax ginseng (Ginseng), Angelica sinensis (Dong quai), Paeonia lactiflora (Peony), Atractylodes macrocephala (Atractylodes), Poria cocos (Hoelen), Cinnamomum cassia (Cinnamon), Astragalus membranaceus (Astragulus), Liqusticum wallichii (Cnidium), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Licorice), and Rehmannia glutinosa (Rehmannia).

It is used in traditional Asian medicine to treat fatigue, anemia, loss of appetite, dry or scaly skin, night sweating, dryness of mouth, and cancer. Breast cancer patients should consult with their physicians before using this formula because dong quai and ginseng may stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells.

Purported Uses
  • Loss of Appetite
    Evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Anemia
    Clinical data show that the formula helps improve anemia.
  • Cancer treatment
    Studies in mice suggest that shi quan da bu tang has anticancer and antimetastatic effects.
    Small studies of cancer patients showed that it may help improve survival and decrease chemotherapy-associated side effects.
  • Dry skin
    Evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Dryness of mouth
    Evidence is lacking to support this claim.
  • Fatigue
    This formula is traditionally used for fatigue. A clinical trial is underway to determine the effectiveness.
  • Night sweating
    Evidence is lacking to support this claim.
Do Not Take If
  • You have hypersensitivity to any of the components in the formula.
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For Healthcare Professionals

Clinical Summary

Shi quan da bu tang is an herbal formula that consists of 10 herbs: Panax ginseng (Ginseng), Angelica sinensis (Dong quai), Paeonia lactiflora (Peony), Atractylodes macrocephala (Atractylodes), Poria cocos (Hoelen), Cinnamomum cassia (Cinnamon), Astragalus membranaceus (Astragalus), Liqusticum wallichii (Cnidium), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Licorice), and Rehmannia glutinosa (Rehmannia) (1). Also known as Juzen-taiho-to in Japan, it is used in traditional medicine to alleviate fatigue, anemia, appetite loss, dry or scaly skin, night sweating, dryness of mouth, and to treat cancer. Supporters believe the formula’s beneficial effects are due to interactions between its components.

Preclinical studies have shown that shi quan da bu tang protects against Alzheimer’s disease (13); prevents muscle atrophy by lowering oxidative stress (19); has antitumor and antimetastatic effects (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (12); exerts radioprotective effects (7); and protects against myelosuppression induced by anticancer drugs (17). Clinical data indicate that it helps improve anemia (14) (15) (16); and is effective in preventing recurrent acute otitis media in children (20).
In oncology settings, the formula has been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects in pancreatic cancer patients (21); to increase survival time in patients with advanced lung cancer (8); and to alleviate hematotoxicity in patients with breast carcinoma receiving chemotherapy (18). Additional trials are underway to determine effectiveness against cancer-related fatigue (22) and anorexia (23); as well as cold hypersensitivity in hands and feet (24).

Breast cancer patients should consult their physicians before using this formula because dong quai and ginseng may stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells (11).

Purported Uses
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Anemia
  • Cancer treatment
  • Dry Skin
  • Dryness of mouth
  • Fatigue
  • Night Sweating

 

Mechanism of Action

Studies using murine models suggest that shi quan da bu tang has antitumor and antimetastatic effects (2) (3) (4) (6) that are mediated by stimulation of macrophages and natural killer cells. The formula also showed radioprotective effects evidenced by an increase in spleen colony forming units in mice exposed to radiation (7); along with stimulating hemopoiesis, in vitro (9).

Contraindications
  • Hypersensitivity to any of the components in the formula.
Herb-Drug Interactions
  • S-1(Tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil): In a murine model, repeated doses of shi quan da bu tang were shown to inhibit the absorption of gimeracil, an inhibitor of 5-FU metabolism, leading to increased elimination and reduced plasma level of 5-FU. Clinical relevance is not known (25).
Dosage (OneMSK Only)
References
  1. Satoh H, et al. Japanese herbal medicine in patients with advanced lung cancer: prolongation of survival. J Altern Complement Med 2002; 8(2):107-8.

  2. Honso Professional Catalog 2002. Honso USA Inc.

  3. Amato P, et al. Estrogenic activity of herbs commonly used as remedies for menopausal symptoms. Menopause 2002 Mar-Apr;9(2):145-50.

  4. Kamiyama H, Takano S, Ishikawa E, Tsuboi K, Matsumura A. Anti-angiogenic and immunomodulatory effect of the herbal medicine “Juzen-taiho-to” on malignant glioma. Biol Pharm Bull. 2005 Nov;28(11):2111-6.

  5. Huang SM, Chien LY, Tai CJ, Chiou JF, Chen CS, Tai CJ.Effectiveness of 3-Week Intervention of Shi Quan Da Bu Tang for Alleviating Hematotoxicity Among Patients With Breast Carcinoma Receiving Chemotherapy. Integr Cancer Ther. 2012 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print]

  6. Ito M, Maruyama Y, Kitamura K, et al. Randomized controlled trial of juzen-taiho-to in children with recurrent acute otitis media. Auris Nasus Larynx. 2017 Aug;44(4):390-397.

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